Question

Today’s #CleanWIP theme and collaborative article is Question. [More info]

Photo by Stafford Green

~ Scott R. Rezer ~
Q: Why do I write?
A: I do so because I enjoy it–not to make a fortune or gain great fame (both would be nice, but unnecessary). Surprising?–imagine my shock to discover this after all these years of writing. I write firstly and most importantly, because I love it; secondly–and this is where you the reader comes in–I write because I like to hear how much others enjoyed what I have written–not how wonderful or how talented you think I am as a writer. I would write no matter what people thought of my ability.
This is why my novels seem so varied. I write about things I care about or that interest me, not to attract readers. I hope that attraction comes about because people like what I write. I know that sounds strange in an industry centered around getting published as the end result of all your hard work. After so many years trying to do just that, I finally came to realize that writing is the part I enjoy–not the publishing. Publishing is just a means of sharing what I love.

~ Hope Toler Dougherty ~
Q: Do you write sequels?
A: I don’t write sequels (or I haven’t yet) because I write happily ever afters, and I don’t want to put characters I love in more pain and conflict. I do, however, bring back favorite characters in new stories.

~ Arthur Daigle ~
Q: Where do you get your ideas from?
A: Everywhere. That’s not a joke or glib answer. I draw inspiration from countless sources. These include history books, science books, TV, video games, weird things I see people wear, conversations I’ve had with total strangers, and more. Sometimes I have no idea where the ideas come from. I’m minding my own business and they appear fully formed.

~ JoAnn Durgin ~
Q: How do you know when you’ve reached the end of a series?
A: I could say, “I just know.” Although it’s true, I realize that’s not a satisfying answer. I’ve written a number of series now, some completed and others ongoing. I write contemporary Christian romance, and my shorter series (three to four books, although I have two “series” with only two books–so far) are either set in small towns or within a close group of friends. My longest-running series, The Lewis Legacy Series, is now 10 books plus a prequel and has become what I call my “signature” series. I’m working on Book 11, and I hope to finish out this original series with the final Book 12 by the end of this year. I know I’ve reached the end of this particular series because all of the original adult characters have now married (or will be married by the end of Book 12). But another huge advantage of a series? The children of these couples are now growing up and my readers are already anticipating The Lewis Heirs Series. 🙂 However, I have another “bridge” series in-between where the original characters pop in from time to time to keep it fun for my readers (and the author!).

~ Laurean Brooks ~
Q: How do you incorporate humor into your stories when the characters are dealing with a serious conflict?
A: Writing humor comes easily for me. It probably springs from my wacky sense of humor. I thought writing funny scenes came naturally for every writer. I didn’t realize some authors struggled to incorporate humor into their stories until one asked me how I did it.
I assign at least one character in each book to be quick-witted. In my current WIP (Half-Price Bride), I have two sassy female characters. They keep the story interesting because whatever comes to their minds flies out of their mouths. I don’t mean vulgar talk—Just clean wit.
Also, when a character enters the room, I might ask: What can I do to make this scene comical? Maybe his shirt is buttoned wrong, his rooster-tail isn’t combed down, or he has a smudge on his face. Another scenario: he may trip over something. Or, his love interest could him talking to his horse. Embarrassing moments are naturally funny.
In my book, Beneath A Macon Moon, Eric wants Jaela to think he sacrificed to take her to an expensive restaurant, when in fact, a customer gave him a gift card to the restaurant. When the waiter loudly announces in front of Jaela, there is enough left on the card for another meal, Eric is humiliated.
My stories deal with characters who struggle to forgive and are afraid to deal with certain issues. Before I let my readers become bogged down, I give them a good dose of humor.

~ M. L. Farb ~
Q: What inspired you to become an author, and how old were you at the time?
A: Some of my earliest memories are laying on the carpet listening to my dad read out loud. We explored the worlds of Narnia and Middle Earth. We cried with Corrie Ten Boom in The Hiding Place. We voyaged with The Kon-Tiki and to Grass Beyond the Mountains.
As a teen I made up stories to help my little sisters go to sleep. It backfired. We stayed up for hours continuing the tale. The King’s Trial was born in those late, whispered nights.
I’ve journaled almost every day since I turned seventeen. I capture conversations, descriptions, happenings, and quotes. I explore ideas. Through the years I’ve written well over a million words. It prepared me to become an author.
I started writing seriously when my youngest started sleeping through the night.